Posts Tagged ‘keyword density’

Is your website ready for mobile devices?

One thing is clear in 2017, if you want to compete in search engines, you must have a mobile-optimized website. This may bring up a lot of questions:

  1. How important is this option to my website?
  2. How do I make my website mobile friendly?
  3. What will it cost to do this?
  4. What else do I need to consider?

There is no single answer to any of these questions but there are some guidelines:

1. First know your desired user.

If your customers or employees use mobile devices frequently or if they do/ want to use a smart phone or tablet, this topic is really important. In general, recent research shows consumers spend 5 HOURS per day on mobile devices. This is especially true for younger age groups, entertainment and sports content and products/services whose marketing relies on social networking.

2. Plan for smaller screens.

The major challenge to using the web on mobile devices is that the amount of space is smaller on these devices. Desktop monitors are typically 24 inches or larger with screen resolutions that are typically twice that of even newer iPads. There are two main ways to address this: responsive design and mobile menu integration.

A responsive website is designed so that it adjusts to the size of the display. Each element and piece of content is reduced in size to conform to the device used to display it. If your website is built that way AND if your content is not too dense, your website may be well received as is. If your content is too dense, it would be wise to add mobile menus and mobile layout so the design changes based on screen size. This reduces the need to magnify the screen or scroll multiple times to see content. The best examples of content dense websites are news organizations. The BBC website is a good example. I reproduced the mobile vs. desktop version below.

Desktop

Desktop

bbc_mobilehomebbc_sectionsmenu                 Mobile menus were used to make the screens less cluttered and still allow users to get to the content. Can you imagine how difficult it would be to read on a small screen?

So for your website, the key is how much information appears on any one page. This is subjective of course. If it does not overload your users, you may not need to create a mobile menu. You still need to use technology that works on mobile devices or else replace it with mobile friendly content. There were plans to integrate Flash into mobile players but that dream never materialized. With the ability to render images in javascript or derivations of it, Flash should be avoided.

3. How much does it cost to mobile optimize?

The question of cost depends on how your website is made currently. If your site was not created as a responsive design and the appearance is poor, we would recommend it be upgraded to a mobile-response theme. If your site was made in html only, it will need to have code inserted into them to detect the device in use. Then a different display will have to be created for each device.

Many content management systems (CMS) have be upgraded to include responsive code for mobile layouts. This includes Joomla, Drupal and WordPress. If your site needs a mobile menu, the steps to create mobile menus are similar. The costs will vary depending. We recommend you discuss the current need, the future and the return on investment with your developer and marketing team and avoid a hasty decision.

4. What standards do I optimize for?

Mobile phones seem to be standardizing around the Android and iPhone operating systems. Tablets seem to be standardizing around the iPad and Kindle operating systems. The screen sizes on each device and each platform determine the screen size and resolution available. So it is worthwhile to stay informed on these specs periodically. Aside from that, how your site displays on a particular mobile browser depends on the age of the device and how the user has it configured.

At Landau Digital we can help you mobile optimize your site.

As experts in Joomla and WordPress, we can convert your site to a responsive layout. By doing this, you can have the perfect layout no matter which device your users are one.

Learn SEO From Your Competitors

SEO can be a confusing and time-intense process, and many of our clients ask over and over where they should focus next. While it would be great if we could implement dozens of SEO tasks, the truth is, it’s much easier to focus on one or two directions at a time. Your search engine competitors can be a wealth of information for honing your SEO strategy.

Find your search engine competitors

Search engine competitors are different than industry competitors. Search engine competitors are the URLs that come up when you search using the keywords you are optimizing for. They may or may not be in your same industry, they are simply the sites that come up based on the search terms entered.

For example, let’s say you provide water damage restoration services. You might search under “water restoration” and see who comes up at the top of Google. The sites who come up on top are your search engine competitors. When I type in this term, I get companies that provide these services, but also an insurance company ranked at #3. So they are your search engine competitor, even though their company does not provide the same services.

If you want to hone in a more localized search, you might put in “water damage Los Angeles” and see who your search engine competitors are for a localized search. It is easier to rank for a localized search, so if you are not well indexed, I would start by analyzing local search engine competitors.

What do I do when I find my competitors?

Choose 2-3 competitors whose sites have good SEO ranking. Once you have made your choice, use the following criteria to analyze the SEO optimization of their website:

1) Content: Where are they using keywords in their content. Use these free keyword density tools to analyze the content and see what the percentage of occurrence is for important keywords. Have they done anything clever with their content in order to weave in keywords. For example, perhaps they show a map with links to city names in order to help get optimized for specific locals.

2) Meta Tags: Right click on the web page and select “view source” in order to see the HTML code for the page. At the very top of the page you will see meta tag information for that specific page. Here you can see if they have input keyword and description meta information to let the search engines know more about the page. SEO rumor has it that this information is no longer important for search engine ranking, but analyze your competitor’s sites to be sure. If they aren’t using it, and they are ranking high, chances are you can skip it too.

3) Title: The title of the page is considered the most important SEO element above all else on the page. The title is at the very top of the browser window, not necessarily the headline shown within the body content of the page. It is important to include keywords in your title. How well have they integrated the keywords into the page title?

4) Heading Tags: Otherwise known as H1, H2 and H3 tags, heading tags on a page are considered more important content than the regular body text. Does your competitor use these heading tags in order to highlight content? If so, have the woven in their keywords? What keywords have they used?

5) Inline links: Inline links refer to links within body text. Joomla web design is an inline link to the Landau Digital website using the words “Joomla web design”. Search engines consider inline links to be much more important than non-linked text. Inline links from body content are the most valuable types of in-bound links for your site (if they come from a page that is of relevant content). Does your competitor use inline links to interlink content on their site which would emphasize specific keywords to help with indexing?

6) Content for SEO: Do they have information on their site that boosts their keyword optimization? For example, if they  provide business coaching for entrepreneurs, do they have articles on their site that talk about business growth strategies?  Do they have a blog that is always adding additional content, which would further index them under optimum keywords?

7) Research their in-bound links: We’ve never found a tool that is 100% reliable for this, but it’s worth it to use some of the tools out there to discover your competitor’s in-bound links. Researching inbound links gives you an idea of how many links they have coming into their website. Read Building on Your Competitor’s Links to learn how to find and utilize this information.

Conclusion

Your competitors can teach you a lot about SEO, and give you a clear direction for where to focus your SEO efforts. We would suggest choosing one competitor each week whose site you analyze in order to glean new ideas for your own SEO strategy.

Free Tools to Analyze Keyword Density

SEO (search engine optimization) is a critical part of any online strategy. While it seems like building your site was a lot of work, to be found amongst to millions of sites, a concerted SEO effort must be employed.

But SEO may seem like a deep, dark black whole of “what the heck am I suppose to do?” While there are a lot of reputable companies helping with excellent search engine optimization campaigns, many small businesses do not have the funds to hire an SEO expert.

Keywords are key

A lot can be done with search engine optimizing methods, but if you do not pay attention to your keywords, then your efforts may be for naught. Choosing keywords is the first step towards optimizing your website. Once you’ve chosen your keywords, analyzing your pages to determine if you have the right keyword density will help you make certain you are on target for SEO.

What is keyword density?

Keyword density indicates the percentage of frequency a word appears on a page and in the meta data. For example, if you have 100 words on your page, and you have the keyword “design” 10 times on that page, then the keyword density for design would be 10%. SEO experts say you shouldn’t go over 15% keyword density on a page because then it appears to be keyword stuffing. The search engines will see this as a negative, and may not index your page.

How word clouds help

Word clouds are a graphic representation of keywords on a specific site or page. Words that appear more frequently are larger within the word cloud, while words that are less frequent are smaller. A word cloud gives you a quick, visual snapshot of the keywords on your site, and dense they are in comparison to each other.

Keyword density analysis tools

The following tools we have found do an excellent job of analyzing keyword density on your site. They are all free and simple to use. You just have to input your URL, and the site does the rest. You do not have to sign up for anything, or even tell them your name, so you can use the tools anonymously and as often as you like.

Tool Name Density Word

Rank

Search

Volume

Phrases Meta

Analysis

Keyword

Cloud

WebSEO Anlaytics X X X X X
SEO Tools X X
Article Underground X X X
goRank X X X
Ranks.nl X X X X X X
MetaMend X X X X

What tools do you like to use?

What are you favorite keyword density tools? Have you found some commercial tools that are worth the price? We’re always open to new ideas, so let us know in the comments about the tools you like to use.